Everything About Hamburg

When I first visited the Hamburg, I did not had the chance to see much of the city's vibrant sights because Hamburg that day was freezing cold and heavy dark clouds was hovering above.

St. Pauli Elbe Tunnel in Hamburg, Germany

St. Pauli Elbe Tunnel in Hamburg, Germany

Perhaps the only place that transformed into one lively spot after the night sets in was the street of Reeperbahn in St. Pauli. I visited KFC and I saw from my table inside the restaurant several young and old alike busy like bees walking here and there looking or expecting for something I don’t know what. I don’t know anything about it. 🙂
Then here I am in Hamburg again. The Hamburg I saw on that cloudy wintry night was totally different from the city I recently enjoyed touring around on a warm sunny day. Everywhere around Hamburg is consistently beautiful so even if you would just walk around the city, you will find Hamburg as beautiful as she really is.
The city had been destroyed three times. First was in the middle of the 19th century, the second was during World War ll and the third was after the war between city planners and architects. 🙂
Some of the streets used to be dominated with neo-classical style houses but mostly were pulled down after the war to give way for new constructions.
But it is not just all about the enigmatic view Hamburg is all about. There are many interesting spots in the city that visitors has to see and explore to complete ones Hamburg travel escapade. I listed some of those must-see sights below. Check this out.

St. Pauli Elbe Tunnel (top photo)
At 426 meters long, the tunnel provides the shortest link between the docks and shipyards on the other side of the river Elbe and the city of Hamburg. That’s why it’s not surprising to see cyclists, motorists and pedestrian traffic activity is actively engaged in this underwater tunnel 24 hours a day.
At both ends of the tunnel, elevators provide access to cyclists, motorists and individuals. Alternately, those who prefer to walk in going down to the tunnel can use the staircase. I’ve tried using the stairs in going down into the tunnel from one side of the river, walked across the tunnel or shall I say “walk across the river” and upon reaching the other end of the river, I took the stairs again when going up and back to the earth’s surface.
Opened in 1911 the St. Pauli Elbe Tunnel is one of Hamburg’s many historic landmarks. Everyday the tunnel is visited by tourists and photographers in order to view and feel what it’s like to walk 24 meters below water and to catch some photos of this interesting and sort of surreal engineering project. Who would have thought that this ambitious and massive engineering infrastructure was made possible during those early years of technological advancement and that’s what make the St. Pauli Elbe Tunnel interesting.

St. Michael’s Church

St. Michael's Church in Hamburg, Germany

St. Michael’s Church in Hamburg, Germany

Skyscrapers are not that prominent over Hamburg’s skyline but the city is architecturally amazing and extensively well-off in a wide range of styles. A prominent landmark defining Hamburg’s skyline are the spires of Hamburg’s churches. One of these churches I visited is the St. Michael’s Church, the most famous church in Hamburg. At 132-meter high, the copper covered Baroque spire is known to be a landfall mark for ships transiting Elbe River.

Hamburg Rathaus – The City Hall of Hamburg

Hamburg_Rathaus

Hamburg Rathaus, The City Hall of Hamburg

At 112-meter high tower, neo-renaissance style Hamburg Rathus is another prominent landmark in Hamburg to visit. This beautiful and huge building is located in the city center in the Altstadt quarter. The lobby is the only public area and it is the venue for concerts, exhibitions and for tours visit.

Hamburg’s Red Light District

Red Light District

Red Light District

This is where the night becomes the most lively district in Hamburg as pubs, bars, restaurants and discotheque transforms the night into a pulsating nightspot. Described as “the most sinful mile” in Hamburg, Reeperbahn, a street in the district of St. Pauli district is the spot for sex shops, brothels, strip clubs and sex museums.
Reeperbahn is one great spot for nightlife. The bars and clubs are worth to check out.
It is known that before The Beatles went to stardom, the groups played in several clubs around the Reeperbahn.
Hamburg’s Red Light DistrictThe red light district was developed in the 19th century as more and more steamer ships came over to Hamburg. Sailors those days frequented the place but today the situation is quite different.

Maritime Museum

Maritime Museum

Maritime Museum

It houses fragments from 3000 years of navigation history.

Warehouses Turned Commercial Offices

Warehouses Turned Commercial Offices

Warehouses Turned Commercial Offices

Here is a wonderful view of a canal and the buildings. During the 19th century, coffee, cacao, tea and spices were very valuable commodities and this is where they were stored.
Nowadays, the old port from the 19th century and many of its warehouses used for storing cocoa, coffee along with several other raw products had been transformed into commercial offices. The image in this area is really different today.
The typical construction material over the centuries in Hamburg had been the bricks. Even in the 20th century, bricks are the preferred material for construction. That’s why today, it is a common sight to see red colored buildings made of bricks.
hamburg_tour
This building looks like a bow of a ship. This is a symbol of recovery after wars and inflation. It’s designed is characterized by vertical and pointing lines with sharp corners.

Houses at the Alster Lake
Houses at the Alster LakeIf Venice is a city built of islands on a lagoon, Hamburg is made of islands on estuary. For a lot of people, the Inner Alster Lake is the most resting place in Hamburg. It manifested the natural beauty of Hamburg.
The lake which was once part of the water mills is now one fantastic place for the wealthy family. It is a nice neighborhood around the lake where Renaissance style and 19th century villas with recreation and jogging area are to be found. These wealthy families living next to the other includes ship owners, merchants, fashion designers and investors to name a few.

Consulate of the Egyptian Republic

Consulate of the Egyptian Republic

Consulate of the Egyptian Republic

Bazars
Bazars in HamburgBazar in HamburgThis is the multicultural neighborhood of Hamburg. This is the preferred shopping area for Turkish and for food sellers. But actually all nationalities visit this place. Shops and restaurants are also found in this area.

Hamburg Music Hall
Hamburg Music HallMusic Hall – Constructed in 1903

The Courtyard
The Courtyard
Living in the courtyard was very usual in Hanseatic cities during those days. Even wealthy families lived in the courtyard.

A growing city where more and more people are coming in looking for job or sometimes for asylum, Hamburg is a very busy port. The city has the largest container port in Germany and second largest in Europe after Rotterdam.
Exploring the highlights of this Hanseatic city and discovering its history and architecture are the highlights of this visit in Hamburg. Even for a very short period of time, I learned a lot of things about Hamburg. So this is it, everything about Hamburg. And you must see it too.

  1. Nice post! Informative and interesting. You made me realise how much of the city I did not get to see when I went there 14yrs ago. But I remember that when I was there it was bitter cold too like the previous time you visited.

    – Amor

    • Hashtag Pinoy says:

      This part of Europe is amazing. But the only thing I complain is the weather… LOL… How I wish it’s always sunny and warm here. Hamburg is really interesting to visit – the old buildings, the museums and etcetera….

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